Harvest Times for Your Homegrown Crops

Wondering if your crops are in prime position for picking? Knowing your plant’s harvest times makes harvesting the very best flavors from your summer garden simple. The Rose Shop, the premier florist in the Salt Lake Valley offers a few simple tips to follow. Harvesting your fruits and vegetables is simple when you know how to pinpoint the perfect conditions for every plant. We will list the most common vegetables planted such as tomatoes, corn, watermelon and peppers and what to look for so you can get pickin’!

Harvest made easy by The Rose Shop

Harvest Times for Tomatoes:

Have you ever noticed the difference between store bought tomatoes and homegrown garden tomatoes? Why do the garden tomatoes taste so good? Well, their sweet tang comes from the tomatoes ability to ripen fully in the delightful sunlight. Pick juicy ripe tomatoes for your plate from the plant every time by following these guidelines:

Harvest time: Mid-July through September.

Signs to look for: The tomato reaches mature color uniformly and releases with was from the vine.

Garden Hints: Ensure your picked tomatoes are kept at room temperature. If an early frost in imminent, harvest all full-size fruits, even if completely green, keep them in a cool area and most of the fruit will eventually ripen.

Knowing when to harvest your tomatoes is simple when listening to The Rose Shops tips on proper harvest times

Harvest Times for Corn:

Make sure the corn you’re throwing on your grill will give you the best flavor by picking it at the peak of its ripeness. You truly can not get quicker or sweeter corn on the cob than freshly picked and grilled corn.

Harvest time: Corn can be grown in successive sowings, bringing yields from mid-July to September.

Signs to look for: When the silk of the corn is brown but still moist the corn is ready for harvesting. The kernels should be full all the way to the top. If the corn kernels are dimpled, the corn is past peak ripeness

Garden Hints: If you’re looking for a hybrid of corn that retain their sweetness longer, look of Peaches and Cream and Kandy Korn kernels to plant. Store corn in the refrigerator for up to a week or blanch and freeze for up to a year.

Harvest corn properly by following the The Rose Shop a premier florist in Salt lake City's advice on when to harvest

Harvest Times for Watermelon:

Juicy, delicious watermelon must make an appearance at any summer get-together. This summer favorite requires a three-month wait and it’s worth every second. Walking up to a watermelon in the grocery store and giving it a good thump is the traditional and most effective ripeness test: Thump the rind with your finger. If it responds with a hollow sound, it’s ripe. If it makes a ringing sound, the melon is still maturing.

Harvest time: Most melon varieties mature in late summer through early fall.

Signs to look for: While meandering through the rows of your garden if you notice the leaf nearest the fruit of the watermelon withers, thump it, if it sounds hollow pick it! It’s ready.

Garden Hints: The thump test doesn’t work on small watermelons. For smaller watermelons, inspect the bottom, once the green of white patch turns yellow, it’s ripe.

knowing when to harvest your fruits and vegetables is made easy by following the florist The Rose Shop's advice on when to harvest

Harvest Times for Peppers:

Some like it hot and if you’re one of those people, plant peppers! Spice up your mealtime experience by only cooking up ripe and flavorful peppers, here’s how:

Harvest time: All pepper varieties ripen from midsummer until the first frost.

Signs to look for: The pepper will be full sized and begin to develop their color.  At this point the flavor and heat will have peaked.  Surprisingly enough, most peppers will be delicious at any size, so if you’re in a pepper crunch and your peppers are lacking in size, pick it, it’ll be delicious,  you’ll just need more of them.

The Rose Shop shares tips on when to harvest your fruits and vegetables